MTI118: How to Not Run Out of Money In Retirement, with Jane Bryant Quinn

Are you close to retirement without adequate savings? Jane Bryant Quinn’s most recent book, How to Make Your Money Last, addresses this problem for those facing retirement and those in retirement.

Social Security, working longer, and how large of a portion bonds should have in your portfolio are the topics of discussion today. Then our esteemed panel adds their commentary with more great nuggets of wisdom.

Jane Bryant Quinn:

A nationally recognized commentator on personal finance and writes for AARP.

She has written numerous books, her most recent being “How to Make Your Money Last”, available now on Amazon or her website, JaneBryantQuinn.com

Today’s Panelists

Doug Goldstein | Rich As A King
Linda P. Jones | Be Wealthy and Smart

Miranda Marquit | PlantingMoneySeeds.com
Joe Saul-Sehy | StackingBenjamins.com

For a quick bio of each of our show participants,  head on over to our panelist page.

Send us your questions for a future Listener Letters episode

Comments

  1. I retired at 53 and started monthly income checks from my IRAs under a government program called SEPP that allows you to structure an early retirement. The amount I took was the Federally computed amount as they recommend, which approximates the 4% rule. 15 years later, I have more money in my IRA accounts than I started with and I’m still taking the checks. Annuities are a joke; expenses (profits for the companies offering them) eat you alive. Stay away from annuities. SS at 70 is also not a no-brainer like many make it seem. Slightest glitch in your health and the years after 70 might be in a wheelchair or non-existent. Consider quality of life and possibility of not living longer and make your own decision. In my case, optimum time to take SS was 64 (computed using several optimizing computer programs).

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